LinkedIn and 3 Other Marketing Musings for Printers

Do you have a LinkedIn strategy? If not, you should.

To get the most out of your marketing content you can’t stop at mailing, emailing, and posting to your website. Leverage LinkedIn both from a company standpoint and an individual standpoint.

Do you use Slideshare to share content on LinkedIn? I’ve had great success with doing just that. Are you starting or engaging in conversations? Are you discovering potential prospects and generating awareness on at least a weekly basis? It’s easier than you think. I’m happy to discuss this with you.

It’s not just you who should be using LinkedIn. Your employees should be using it, too. Every employee is a promoter of your brand.

It’s all about the Customer Experience. Stop looking at your marketing efforts from a marketing perspective and start looking at them from a customer’s perspective. Do you really think customers are eager to get more ads and promotions? Are they impressed by seeing boilerplate and generic content on your website? Start viewing your marketing (and sales) from the standpoint of the customer.

If you have an “in the can website,” customize it! Add your own content. Generic blog content and business advice that isn’t related to your solutions is a bad for your brand. Stand out rather than just being part of the marketing noise.

Too many printers still view their marketing efforts the same way they do their sales efforts. They want instant results and easy-to-grasp measurability. They confuse marketing campaigns with direct response campaigns. When the marketing fails to generate much response, the efforts become inconsistent and eventually die out all together.

I’m offering free 20-minute consultations during the last week of October.
Feel free to reach out to me if you would like to schedule some time. Pat@greatreachinc.com

Newsletters For Printers: Eight Things to Consider

There’s no doubt that an informative company newsletter is one of the best ways a printer can help market their services. If you’re thinking about utilizing a print newsletter to market your company, here are some things to consider.

  1. Print or email? My advice is to utilize both. Cross media. But if you just use one, consider the fact that even the best designed email newsletters fall prey to spam filters. On the other hand, if you have limited financial resources, an email newsletter is much less costly to produce and distribute.
  2. 80/20 rule. Your content should be 80% educational and 20% promotional. If your content is relevant to the services you offer, then it’s promotional without being promotional.
  3. It’s about them, not you. Your content should be more focused on providing your audience with useful information and less about the goings-on at your company. However, some company news can be beneficial to your marketing effort. Community service, milestones, new services launches, etc. are great for engagement and branding. Just try to strike the proper balance.
  4. How relevant is your content? Don’t waste your time and money sending out jokes, recipes, and generic content that has no direct relevance to the services your company provides. You just make it easier for your brand to blend in and become part of the noise. People will tune you out. The key is to stand out from your competition by promoting thought leadership, competency and trust. Your content needs to be better than your competitors.
  5. Frequency. How often can you realistically get a newsletter out the door? If it’s only email, it should be monthly. No less than bi-monthly. However, if you opt for print only or print and email, then consider if you can produce a print piece quarterly, bi-monthly, or monthly. Be realistic. At a minimum, you need to touch your audience every 90 days. Strong marketers tighten that to every 30 days.
  6. Word counts. The trend is towards shorter content. Newsletter articles should be under 500 words (maximum, shoot for 400). Email under 375.
  7. Page counts. The newsletters themselves can be single article (2 page) or multiple articles (8 pages). That’s something to consider when you determine your frequency. If you are only engaging your audience 4 times a year, consider a multiple article format with a magazine look and feel so that it sticks around longer. If it were bi-monthly or monthly, a two page format might be more realistic.
  8. Beware of the committee approach. As a print marketer once said, “the act of trying to create the perfect piece often ends up being the reason for doing nothing.”

I’ve been supplying printers and mailers with customizable, area exclusive newsletter solutions for 20 years. I’m happy to discuss your challenges, review your materials, and offer any advice.